Network Neutrality – 10 Sources

Topic: Network Neutrality

Title: F.C.C. Seeks to Protect Free Flow of Internet Data

New York Times, Sep. 18, 2009

Hansell, Saul http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/19/technology/internet/19net.html?_r=1

Accessed: Feb. 8, 2010

Category: Mainstream Journalistic; news report from the web version of the New York Times

Summary: The FCC is planning on adding a fifth principle to its “four principles” policy of network neutrality – the fifth principle would help ensure that Internet providers don’t discriminate based on usage or application choices made by the consumer. In addition, the FCC is seeking to make the principles more formal and enforceable than they currently are.

Summary of sources

Julius Genachowski, chairman of the FCC

CTIA, the wireless trade group

President Obama

Comcast

These sources include the official government bodies in charge of telecommunications regulations as well as groups affected by said regulations.

Source Analysis

With 14 million readers, the New York Times is no longer simply a local paper for New York City, as it was at its inception in the 1800s. Generally considered left-leaning, it has been argued that this bias is based on the generally liberal atmosphere of its location.

Usefulness

This story explained what the FCC was planning on changing as far as telecommunications policy went, as well as some concerns raised by industry lobbyists and compromises that might be met. It serves as an excellent snapshot of where the debate is at present, and offers insight into where it might head in the future.

Works cited

NY Times media kit: http://www.nytimes.whsites.net/mediakit/online/audience/audience_profile.php

Okrent, Daniel. “Is the New York Times a liberal newspaper?” The New York Times. July 25, 2004. Accessed Feb. 8, 2010

(Not copying you, Tracy, but these were the very first things I checked as well.)


Topic: Network Neutrality

Title: Google Broadband Play Pushes Network Neutrality in Google’s Favor

eWeek, Feb. 11, 2010

Boulton, Clint http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Search-Engines/Google-Broadband-Play-Pushes-Network-Neutrality-in-Googles-Favor-681320/

Accessed: Feb. 11, 2010

Category: Mainstream Journalistic; news report from the web version of eWeek

Summary: Google’s new plans for offering broadband services may be motivated by a desire to protect the company’s policy of protecting network neutrality rather than the more obvious goal of entering into the ISP market.

Summary of sources

Alex Winogradoff , Gartner analyst

Ben Schachter, BroadPoint AmTech analyst

Google

These sources represent analyst opinions and Google’s corporate policy in the nature of Google’s broadband deployment.

Source Analysis

eWeek was previously known as PC Week, and is primarily a computing business magazine. It’s been in circulation since 1983, and continues in its original form to this day. As an industry publication, there’s very little room for bias, as eWeek primarily serves to review the state of the industry based on market analysis and corporate data.

Usefulness

This report shows steps taken by a major member of the industry itself toward network neutrality, highlighting internal support for the potential FCC “fifth principle” regulation. It serves as look into climate of the industry as the FCC tries to deploy new regulation.

Works cited

eWeek’s “About Us” page: http://www.eweek.com/c/a/IT-Management/About-Us/

Owning company Ziff Davis Enterprises page: http://sales.netmediaeurope.com/2008/03/netmediaeurope.html


Topic: Network Neutrality

Title: Google Public Policy Blog

http://googlepublicpolicy.blogspot.com/search/label/Net%20Neutrality

Accessed: Feb. 11, 2010

Category: Instution; Google blog releases on corporate public policy concerning network neutrality.

Summary: A string of public policy announcements dating back to summer 2007 in which Google tries to rally support for net neutrality from its clients and customers. Topics includes blog posts explaining why people should care to rallying cries for action in the form of writing the FCC and the like.

Summary of sources

Rick Whitt, Google Washington Telecom and Media Counsel

Megan Stull, Google Telecom Policy Counsel

Eric Schmidt ,Google CEO

Lowell McAdam, Verizon Wireless CEO

Julius Genachowski, FCC Chairman

Vint Cerf, one of the original architects of the Internet

AT&T

These sources represent the most important and recent sources of the blog, covering most of the corporate, governmental, and institutional views on the debate via representatives.

Source Analysis

As the official public policy blog of Google, this source offers a perspective specifically reflecting it’s parent company’s views on the issue.

Usefulness

The official public policy of Google offers a perspective on network neutrality and what the FCC should do about it from inside the industry from a pro-neutrality stance, as well as naming Google’s allies in their objective. This helps me piece together what the general viewpoint on the issue of network neutrality from one far end of the issue.

Works cited

http://googlepublicpolicy.blogspot.com/


Topic: Network Neutrality

Title: NETWORK NEUTRALITY: COMPETITION,

INNOVATION, AND NONDISCRIMINATORY ACCESS

United States Congress, Apr. 15 2006

http://uolibraries.worldcat.org/oclc/71202145?page=frame&url=http%3A%2F%2Fpurl.access.gpo.gov%2FGPO%2FLPS73532%26checksum%3D3e891185f39f6af37886caec9dc15ebb&title=&linktype=opacFtLink

Accessed: Feb. 11, 2010

Category: Government; A transcript of the 2006 hearing on the Taskforce on Telecom and Antitrust regarding network neutrality

Summary: A congressional hearing on network neutrality and specifically the risk of ineffective antitrust measures if network neutrality isn’t brought into legal effect, citing the market power, lack of strong regulations, and lobbyist ability on the part of anti-neutrality parties in the telecommunications industry. Arguments are made by both representatives and industry spokespeople both in favor and in opposition to stronger regulations.

Summary of sources

Rep. Chris Cannon

Rep. John Conyers

Paul Misener, Amazon.com Vice President for Global Public Policy

Earl W. Comstock, COMPTEL President and Chief Executive Officer

Walter B. McCormick, Jr., United States Telecom Association President and Chief Executive Officer

These sources represent all major interested parties in the hearing, both governmental and institutional. Other sources not listed are found in the appendix of the report, and are omitted due to their secondary nature.

Source Analysis

As an official transcription of a U.S. Congressional antitrust hearing, there’s no bias whatsoever here, as it’s merely a record of the proceedings.

Usefulness

This is a convenient look at what kind of issues the industry is bringing to the attention of the U.S. Government, as well as what kind of information will be available to other governmental bodies such as the FCC interested in instituting/refining existing regulations.

Works cited

http://judiciary.house.gov


Topic: Network Neutrality

Title: FAQ on Net Neutrality

Susan Crawford blog, May 31 2006

Crawford, Susan http://scrawford.blogware.com/blog/_archives/2006/5/31/1998151.html

Accessed: Feb. 11, 2010

Category: Citizen; a personal blog post from someone who has been a presidential aide and otherwise very involved in the network neutrality debate.

Summary: Susan argues that regulation protecting network neutrality is essential for the health of the Internet as a whole, claiming that pro-neutrality regulations are no less than a “right-to-life” issue – without them, nascent internet users/content producers may not ever be able to come into existing, being throttled as they are by tiered internet.

Summary of sources

Susan Crawford, blog owner and former telecommunications aide to President Obama

Susan references no one in particular, offering only her own opinion and experiences in her blog.

Source Analysis

Susan Crawford is a law professor at the University of Michigan, a former ICANN board member, founder of OneWebDay, and President Obama’s former Special Assistant for Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy. She has in-depth, hands-on experience with the network neutrality debate.

Usefulness

This blog post highlights a private (though very well informed and connected) citizen’s views on the issue of network neutrality and its implications. Public opinion like this will undoubtedly play a part in determining what shape FCC regulations take.

Works cited

Wired.com’s look at Crawford: http://www.wired.com/politics/onlinerights/magazine/17-07/mf_cio?currentPage=2

ICANN’s special thanks page: http://www.icann.org/en/minutes/resolutions-07nov08.htm#_Toc55609378

Crawford’s bio page: http://scrawford.net/blog/about/

Topic: Network Neutrality

Title: Before the Federal Communications Commission Washington, D.C. 20554 NOTICE OF PROPOSED RULEMAKING FCC 09-93

FCC, Oct. 22 2009

http://www.wired.com/images_blogs/epicenter/2009/10/fcc-09-93a1.pdf

Accessed: Feb. 11, 2010

Category: Government; an FCC proposal on network neutrality regulations

Summary: A proposal by an FCC chairmen and four commissioners suggesting, despite some minor internal disagreement, that the “fifth principle” of fair Internet usage be approved as official regulation in order to product Internet users from discrimination based on site or application usage.

Summary of sources

Genachowski, Chairman

Copps, Commissioner

Clyburn, Commissioner

McDowell, Commissioner

Baker, Commissioner

These sources represent different viewpoints within the body of the FCC on what regulations the FCC should adopt.

Source Analysis

This is a governmental transcription of statements; there’s no bias to be had, as with most official governmental releases.

Usefulness

This source highlights an internal opinion on how FCC regulations should be formed, and serves as a look at the possible direction of formal policy making regarding adopting the “fifth principle” and adding stronger enforcement capabilities to existing and new FCC net neutrality policies.

Works cited

http://www.fcc.gov/

Topic: Network Neutrality

Title: NATIONAL CABLE & TELECOMMUNICATIONS
ASSOCIATION et al.
v. BRAND X INTERNET
SERVICES et al.

Supreme Court of the United States, Jun. 27 2005

http://www.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/04-277.ZS.html

Accessed: Feb. 11, 2010

Category: Government; A Supreme Court hearing on the nature of cable Internet

Summary: A Supreme Court hearing on the nature of cable Internet that ultimately came to the conclusion that cable Internet is an information service rather than a telecommunication service, unlike the prior precedent-setting view that dial-up Internet – relying as it does on phone lines – was a telecommunication service. This freed the cable industry from the anti-discrimination regulation already in place, as per the decision of the FCC.

Summary of sources

The Supreme Court of the United States

The singularity of the source is due to this being an official ruling by the court as a whole.

Source Analysis

There is no opinion in the Supreme Court ruling. Furthermore, the Supreme Court has often gone back and forth on the issue of network neutrality, as evidenced by the remanded status of this ruling; there seems to be no bias within the source.

Usefulness

This is an excellent look at historical rulings on regulation enforcement by the FCC in matters of network neutrality. It provides a good background and precedent for what is happening presently in the debate – background rulings (and their outcomes) are what present rulings are based on, after all.

Works cited

http://www.supremecourtus.gov/index.html

Topic: Network Neutrality

Title: U.S. as Traffic Cop in Web Fight: FCC Proposal on Bandwidth a Boon for Consumers and Silicon Valley, Blow to Telecoms

Wall Street Journal, Sep. 21, 2009

Schatz, Amy http://online.wsj.com/article/SB125329467451823485.html#mod=WSJ_hps_LEFTWhatsNews

Accessed: Feb. 8, 2010

Category: Mainstream Journalistic; news report from the web version of the Wall Street Journal

Summary: The FCC is planning on backing consumers by enforcing a ban on ISP discrimination – both favorable and unfavorable – based on website usage or application choices, including on mobile networks. This will likely result in an overloading of mobile networks as available bandwidth is exceeded, as well as investment by mobile companies and more mainstream telecommunication companies in better infrastructure and bandwidth-saving measures. It will also likely result in a flurry of lobbyist-led challenges to the FCC ruling.

Summary of sources

Jonathan Zittrain, Co-founder of the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University

Julius Genachowski, Head of the Federal Communications Commission

CTIA, the wireless trade group

Randolph May, President of Free State Foundation

Chris Guttman-McCabe, CTIA Vice President of Regulatory Affairs

AT&T

These sources are comprised of both opponents and supporters of the plans proposed by the FCC. They represent lobbyists and experts, as well as members of the FCC itself – all are individuals that have the potential to weigh in on FCC regulations.

Source Analysis

With over 24 million readers annually, the Wall Street Journal is the most widely read newspaper in the United States. Although long considered a polarized paper (with a traditionally conservative editorial section and liberal news section), its recent acquisition by News Corp. has led to allegations of increasing conservative slant. However, in articles such as those regarding network neutrality, it seems to offer multiple perspectives – conservative, liberal, moderate, and otherwise – in equal measure.

Usefulness

This story explores the possible repercussions of the proposed FCC regulations, and offers context for the issue as a whole.

Works cited

NY Times report: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/14/business/media/14carr.html

Academic review: http://www.sscnet.ucla.edu/polisci/faculty/groseclose/Media.Bias.8.htm

Topic: Network Neutrality

Title: Save the Internet: Frequently Asked Questions

http://www.savetheinternet.com/frequently-asked-questions

Accessed: Feb. 11, 2010

Category: Institution; FAQ list from the website savetheinternet.com, a branch of Free Press

Summary: savetheinternet.com claims that without proper regulations by the FCC, the Internet is at risk of losing its freedom of information – arguably its most valuable point. If discrimination based on website usage and application choice is allowed to become a reality, they claim, it’ll become much like cable TV – paying for extra content.

Summary of sources

Rep. Edward Markey

Rep. Anna Eshoo

William L. Smith, Chief Technology Officer for BellSouth Corp.

Ed Whitacre, Former AT&T Chief

The sources listed include the U.S. Representatives in charge of the Internet Freedom Preservation Act of 2009 and the industry leaders who went on file opposing network neutrality.

Source Analysis

Free Press is a non-partisan, non-profit media advocacy group dedicated to the preservation of network neutrality. Their position is clear.

Usefulness

This is another example of institutional support of network neutrality, this time from an outside group rather than an industry group.

Works cited

Net Neutrality’s Quiet Crusader: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/03/27/AR2008032703618.html

Topic: Network Neutrality

Title: No net neutrality in National Broadband Plan

The Swine Line, Jun. 8, 2009

Schatz, Tom http://swineline.org/2009/06/08/no-net-neutrality-in-national-broadband-plan/

Accessed: Feb. 10, 2010

Category: Institution; blog post by a member of the Citizens Against Government Waste organization

Summary: The blogger argues that if network neutrality were to become enforced via regulation, the primary effect would be a waste of taxpayer dollars, as offices were specifically set up to monitor for ISP abuses. Further, he contends, network neutrality laws would hamper innovation by the telecommunications industry, as they wouldn’t want to waste money on products they couldn’t control.

Summary of sources

FCC

The only source mentioned in the article is the FCC in regards to its Notice of Inquiry (NOI). Everything else is speculation/opinion.

Source Analysis

The Citizens Against Government Waste are a non-profit partisan advocacy group for fiscal conservative ideals. It has a history of supporting large corporations, and has found itself at the middle of quite a bit of controversy due to allegations of assisting voter fraud, posing as a grassroots organization when it isn’t, and serving as a mouthpiece of corporations, rather than an independent body.

Usefulness

This provides a rare but useful counter view to the seemingly dominant populist support of network neutrality, and provides further context for possible regulations by the FCC.

Works cited

http://www.sptimes.com/2006/04/02/Worldandnation/For_price__watchdog_w.shtml

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/10/12/AR2006101200889_pf.html

(Edited for clarity, tags, links)

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